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Inside Robert Downey Jr.’s Windmill Home in the Hamptons | Open Door | Architectural Digest
 
04:59
In this episode of Open Door, Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man, Avengers) and wife Susan Downey turned a converted windmill into a stylish and charming Hamptons home. In this funny, full-access house tour, the Downeys show off their favorite art, let you into their closets and explain why their cats have full run of the place. "We wanted something we haven’t seen a million times,” the Iron Man star says, describing the property itself as well as the decorative ministrations of AD100 designer Joe Nahem and the team at New York City–based Fox-Nahem Associates. The Downeys originally met Nahem two summers ago, when they rented the heavenly Amagansett country house the designer shares with his partner, Jeffrey Fields. The Downeys said goodbye to Nahem and Fields that summer with a request that the designers alert them to any particularly enticing properties coming onto the market in the Hamptons. Several months later, Nahem found a place that more than fit the bill: a late–19th century windmill folly, originally constructed as a playhouse, that had been transformed into a full-fledged residence by way of structural additions grafted onto the building in the decades following its construction. Among the many attributes of the estate were proximity to the town of East Hampton coupled with the privacy of a secluded location, enchanting gardens conjured by landscape designer Joseph Tyree for the home’s previous owners, and those sublime trees that dot the lawns like masterpieces of sculpture. Nahem didn’t have much time to revel in the triumph of his matchmaking. As soon as his clients acquired the property, they gave their designer a mere six weeks to transform the home into a Downey-rific sanctuary keyed to the couple’s adventurous aesthetic tastes and the comfort of their children, five-year-old son Exton and three-year-old daughter Avri. (The actor has another son, 24-year-old Indio, with his ex-wife, Deborah Falconer.) Happily, once the holiday season was over, Nahem and his team were able to return to the home and begin the renovation in earnest. One of the biggest changes was the reconfiguration of the living room that lies just beyond the octagonal entry foyer at the base of the windmill. To give the transitional area a greater sense of place, the designer sunk the living room several feet and anchored it with a massive wraparound fireplace wall by ceramic artist Peter Lane. Another major component of the renovation involved rethinking the pool area to suit the Downeys’ vision of easy, breezy outdoor leisure. Rather than making the guesthouse do double duty as a swimming cabana, as it had in the previous scheme, Nahem designed a freestanding poolside pavilion, in collaboration with Alveary Architecture, replete with a dining setup centered on a mosaic-topped table by Kelly Behun Studio, an outdoor living room and bar, and a television almost as large as the screens at the local multiplex. As for the interiors of the house itself, the mix represents an amiable consensus among the Downeys and their designer: pedigreed pieces and unpretentious off-the-rack staples, poppy colors and soothing neutrals, eccentric accents and discreet luxuries. It’s an idiosyncratic assemblage that speaks equally to the actor’s puckish spirit, his wife’s concerns for efficiency and ease, and Nahem’s finesse in crafting eminently livable homes with a touch of otherworldly magic. Read the full story here - https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/robert-downey-jr-hamptons-home Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Robert Downey Jr.’s Windmill Home in the Hamptons | Open Door | Architectural Digest
Views: 8122016 Architectural Digest
Ellen Pompeo Gives a House Tour of Her Home With Martyn Lawrence Bullard | Architectural Digest
 
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Grey’s Anatomy star Ellen Pompeo gives Architectural Digest a tour of her home with some insight from her interior designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard. The house was built by Paul Williams who was hired by silent film star Antonio Moreno, Jr. Though Pompeo initially didn't like Bullard's idea of wood on the walls of the dining room, once she saw it in action, it became her favorite room. The kitchen was originally three rooms, created in the '20s, but now is "the heart of the home". The biggest challenges had the biggest payoff. The balcony is such a great feature. The yard was unusable but is now a full usable acre. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Ellen Pompeo Gives a House Tour of Her Home With Martyn Lawrence Bullard | Architectural Digest
Views: 2394977 Architectural Digest
Inside Liev Schreiber’s Renovated NYC Apartment | Open Door | Architectural Digest
 
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In this episode of "Open Door", "Ray Donovan" actor Liev Schreiber gives a tour of his renovated NYC apartment. The interior design firm Ashe + Leandro turned Schreiber's old bachelor pad into a home for him and his two sons. From the AD article: Liev Schreiber Invites AD to Tour His New York City Apartment "Client-designer communication can be a delicate thing. It doesn’t typically involve quoting “Sprockets.” But in 2016, when Liev Schreiber decided to retool his triplex apartment in Manhattan’s NoHo district, the Saturday Night Live reference just seemed right. The initial brainstorms yielded proposals that struck the actor as “uncomfortably Teutonic,” he says, recounting his lively give-and-take with Ariel Ashe and Reinaldo Leandro, the 30-something principals who head up the AD100 New York design firm Ashe + Leandro. “Like, ‘I know you want to touch my monkey.’ Schreiber, of course, nails this line—the accent, the inflection—with diamond-laser accuracy. He couldn’t have found a better audience for it. Ashe’s first design job was on set at SNL, and her brother-in-law is Seth Meyers. Suffice it to say, she has a sense of humor. More to the point, Ashe and Leandro’s work has an easygoing cool to it; it’s rigorous, but it’s also relaxed, not unlike the duo themselves. So, you don’t want “Sprockets”? OK, no “Sprockets.” Put into practice at Schreiber’s apartment, the Ashe + Leandro approach—modernist yet utterly livable—has yielded something that all three agree is rare in the age of too-tall, too-skinny condo towers and Edison-bulbed brownstone renos. The space itself has some backstory: Starting in the late ’90s, Schreiber cobbled together the three-level, three-bedroom apartment from a couple of units in this circa-1880, redbrick, Neo-Grec industrial building. The Yale Drama grad’s career had taken off following a breakthrough role in Nora Ephron’s Mixed Nuts. Soon enough came Scream (and Scream 2), and an eye-opening turn as Hamlet in 1999 at the Public Theater, just a few blocks away. The bachelor pad, tricked out with help from his older brother, a stonemason, served Schreiber well. After he partnered up with Naomi Watts, in 2005, the place became the stage for a whole new production: family life. (Their sons, Sasha and Kai, are now ten and nine.) Still, the couple got the itch for a new home. And in 2012, they found digs farther downtown, hiring Ashe and Leandro to do the job (AD, March 2016). When Schreiber and Watts separated, in late 2016, he was determined to create something new from his beloved old NoHo apartment. He felt a real rapport with the designers, so he enlisted them to update the space for his life now. The actor may play tough on TV, but we’re talking about a fellow who’s been known to dip into Seneca and Montaigne, who spends quality time with the novelist Jonathan Safran Foer, whose IMDb listing oozes quality, and who is a familiar presence around the neighborhood, walking Woody, his very cute Hurricane Harvey rescue dog, or cycling with his boys. With his mix of well-honed urbanity and street savvy, Schreiber is every bit a New Yorker’s New Yorker. So is the apartment, with its distressed-oak floors, steel staircases, wide-open flow, and old-school galley kitchen with new-school black stone counters and sleek Miele appliances, where Schreiber might offer a visiting friend fresh-baked banana bread and a cup of PG Tips tea. It’s also where he gathers his sons for meals, for their presence is unmistakable here, from the bedrooms outfitted with Prouvé and Eames chairs and Harry Potter wands to the board games and the student nylon-string guitar propped up in the living room. Schreiber’s own quarters are a low-key affair, with one indulgence: a walk-in closet, which prompts him to exclaim, “This I thought I would never have!” Up on the top floor, there’s a glassed-in mini gym flooded with light. “This is the room Ray Donovan built,” he jokes. It doubles as a meditation room. (Schreiber spent part of his childhood at an ashram school.) For an apartment overrun by two growing boys, there’s a lot of calm and order. Schreiber likes it that way." See more here: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/liev-schreiber-new-york-city-apartment Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Liev Schreiber’s Renovated NYC Apartment | Open Door | Architectural Digest
Views: 903574 Architectural Digest
Patrick Dempsey Gives a House Tour of His Malibu Home Designed by Frank Gehry | Architectural Digest
 
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Patrick Dempsey (aka Dr. Derek Shepherd aka McDreamy on "Grey's Anatomy") talks with Architectural Digest about his Malibu house designed by Frank Gehry. The actor and his wife, Jillian, adapt one of Frank Gehry’s earliest houses as a vibrant and light-filled family compound At their residence in Malibu, California, actor Patrick Dempsey and his wife, Jillian, are joined by their children—daughter Talula and sons Darby and Sullivan—and their French bulldog, Horton, in an outdoor dining area appointed with Teak Nichols Design furniture. Conceived by architect Frank Gehry in the late 1960s, the house has been updated with landscaping by Shrader Design and decor by Estee Stanley Interior Design. A pivoting glass panel functions as the front door; the wall sculpture of fluorescent tubes is by Robert Irwin. Entrance Hall - A vintage Jacques Adnet daybed from Blackman Cruz beckons in the entrance hall. Living Room - Chaise longues by Brenda Antin flank a Jillian Dempsey sculpture in the living room; the antique mirror is from Blackman Cruz, and the club chair is by Richard Shapiro/Studiolo. Custom-made sofas upholstered in a Great Plains fabric stand before the living room fireplace, which is surmounted by a Waldo’s Designs mirror; the painting at left is by Thomas Helbig, the large round table is by Dos Gallos Furniture, and the Alma Allen low stool (used as an end table) is from Heath Ceramics. Jillian Dempsey made the sculpture displayed on the cocktail table. Dining Area - Fashion photographs by Melvin Sokolsky are displayed in a dining area outfitted with chairs from Lucca Antiques and a custom-made Teak Nichols Design table; in the background hangs a 1960s Raak light fixture from Obsolete. Outdoor Dining Area - Shrader Design created the outdoor dining space, which is shaded by a metal-framed wicker canopy. Kitchen - The kitchen features a concrete sink and countertops as well as a Wolf range and a Best hood. Studio - The sculpture studio’s custom-made Shrader Design sofa is clad in a Great Plains fabric and features decorative pillows by Brenda Antin; the cocktail tables are by Lucca Antiques, the leather daybed/bench is by Caste, the floor lamp is from Obsolete, and the Moroccan carpet is from Lawrence of La Brea. A drafting table and stools are also among the furnishings in the sculpture studio. Master Bedroom - Ginger, another family dog, rests in the master bedroom, where a Teak Nichols Design bed is accented with Deborah Sharpe Linens pillows and a throw from Monc XIII; the mirror and the hanging chair are 1960s, and the table lamp is by Blackman Cruz. Master Bath - In the master bath, a Jillian Dempsey sculpture sits atop a rustic table. Talula’s room is furnished with custom-made burlap curtains, ABC Carpet & Home bed linens, a chair by Brenda Antin, and floor cushions by Nickey Kehoe. Pool - Darby and Sullivan leap into the swimming pool, which is surrounded by a recycled-wood deck; the seating is cushioned with Perennials fabrics. Airstream Trailer - An Airstream trailer serves as a romantic hideaway. Garden - Flowers, herbs, and vegetables flourish in a garden’s raised beds, which are constructed from reclaimed scaffolding; the area is paved with gravel and stabilized decomposed granite. Fire Pit - A cushioned concrete seating area with a fire pit offers a cozy spot for relaxing outdoors. The estate also features a chicken coop made of recycled wood, miniature donkeys, outdoor oven, and a tin house. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Patrick Dempsey Gives a House Tour of His Malibu Home Designed by Frank Gehry | Architectural Digest
Views: 2056384 Architectural Digest
Inside Mandy Moore's $2.6 Million Mid-century Home in Pasadena | Open Door
 
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In this episode of Open Door, "This is Us" actress and musician Mandy Moore takes Architectural Digest on a tour of the $2.6 million mid-century home she purchased with fiancé Taylor Goldsmith in Pasadena. After buying the property, Moore worked with Sarah Sherman Samuel to renovate the four-bedroom house designed by architect Harold Zook. The property features 1.45 acres of land, 360-degree views, floor-to-ceiling glass walls, a breakfast nook, a spa, and a pool. See photos and read the full interview here: http://archdg.co/yTF9ZJc Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Mandy Moore's $2.6 Million Mid-century Home in Pasadena | Open Door
Views: 1931683 Architectural Digest
Inside Jesse Tyler Ferguson's Home | Open Door
 
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In this episode of 'Open Door', actor Jesse Tyler Ferguson (Mitchell Pritchett on 'Modern Family') takes Architectural Digest on a tour of the Spanish Colonial home he shares with his husband Justin Mikita. Jesse is especially grateful to former house owner Gwen Stefani for putting in a beautiful pool. Check out photos of Jesse's home and read the full interview here: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/inside-jesse-tyler-ferguson-and-justin-mikitas-los-feliz-home-where-wit-and-warmth-rule?mbid=youtube Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Jesse Tyler Ferguson's Home | Open Door
Views: 806698 Architectural Digest
Inside Zachary Quinto’s $3.2 Million NYC Loft | Open Door | Architectural Digest
 
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In this episode of Open Door, actor Zachary Quinto (Spock in the 'Star Trek' reboot, Gabriel Gray aka Sylar in 'Heroes') and painter / model Miles McMillan welcome Architectural Digest into their $3.2 million loft in the NoHo section of Manhattan, NYC. See photos and read the full interview here: http://archdg.co/rNZTODx Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Zachary Quinto’s $3.2 Million NYC Loft | Open Door | Architectural Digest
Views: 1454526 Architectural Digest
Inside Wiz Khalifa's $4.6 Million L.A. House | Open Door
 
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In this episode of 'Open Door', rapper Wiz Khalifa takes Architectural Digest on a tour of his $4.6 million house in the Sherman Oaks section of Los Angeles. The abode features a dab bar, weed wall, heated pool, and a gumball machine. See photos and read the full interview here: http://archdg.co/mIvxkyT Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Wiz Khalifa's $4.6 Million L.A. House | Open Door
Views: 13058420 Architectural Digest
Inside Lily Aldridge's Nashville Home | Open Door
 
06:29
In this episode of 'Open Door', Victoria's Secret and Sports Illustrated swimsuit supermodel Lily Aldridge gives Architectural Digest a tour of the cozy Nashville home she shares with her husband Caleb Followill and their daughter. If you happen to be driving through Nashville in December and see a stately brick Tudor Revival house spectacularly ablaze with holiday lights, you just might have hit on the dwelling of Lily Aldridge and Caleb Followill. While she is admittedly better known as a Victoria’s Secret bombshell and face of Bulgari than an overzealous homemaker, and her other half as the lead singer of rock band Kings of Leon, the couple, parents to six-year-old daughter Dixie, enthusiastically put family life center stage when they’re off duty. When it comes to model–rocker unions, domesticity is a somewhat foreign concept. Studio 54 set the stage for Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall’s glamorous courtship. Axl Rose and Stephanie Seymour’s volatile romance played out in a series of music videos that ended with her in a coffin (not surprisingly, their unscripted relationship fizzled in almost as dramatic a fashion). But for Aldridge and Followill, who rarely make public appearances à deux, the theatrics appear to be reserved for their charming abode, composed of grand archways, Persian carpets, and a gloriously tiled kitchen. “Home is everything,” says the California native, who relocated to Nashville after meeting her Tennessee-born husband more than a decade ago. Dixie’s birth sparked the couple’s move from a kicky condo located near the city’s nightlife scene and sports arena to “a home near a great school,” Aldridge says of how their priorities shifted upon becoming parents. She immediately fell in love with this one: “It was beautiful, comfy, cozy.” She pauses. “My husband, on the other hand, wanted to move into a different house.” To help persuade him that the Tudor Revival, though a bit old-fashioned in appearance, was the perfect address, she called on designers and close friends Louisa Pierce and Emily Ward of Pierce & Ward. The duo count Karen Elson, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Dakota Johnson among their starry clientele, and Pierce had previously decorated Aldridge and Followill’s condo. We both travel a lot for work, but we do everything in our power to have a normal life here. A recognition of the 1930 house’s good bones helped seal the deal: wood floors, beamed ceilings, expansive windows. “I love those details, and they’re hard to re-create,” Aldridge explains. Her husband gave in, and in the span of just four months, during much of which Followill was on tour and Aldridge out of town on modeling assignments, Pierce and Ward renovated and decorated every square inch of the place. For the decor, Aldridge presented the designers with a Pinterest board of inspirations ranging from romantic English country houses to exotic Moroccan riads. “We were all on the same page,” says Ward, who, with Pierce, cheerfully scavenged antiques stores and eBay for eclectica such as leather club chairs, poufs, chandeliers, and a mélange of midcentury-modern pieces. Each room is imbued with a relaxed, family-friendly elegance. The kitchen features open cabinetry with a decorative retro tile backsplash, and it’s where Followill holds court. The living room is framed in arched bookshelves with a fireplace she keeps crackling “until it’s unbearably hot outside” and a pair of club chairs that remind her of the ones her artist father had in his studio during her youth. “The leather was literally peeling off the seats,” she recalls. Read more here: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/lily-aldridge-takes-ad-inside-her-bohemian-1930s-tudor-revival Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Lily Aldridge's Nashville Home | Open Door
Views: 791599 Architectural Digest
Lily Collins Takes the First-Ever AD IQ Test | Architectural Digest
 
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Lily Collins takes a break from promoting her new Netflix film, To the Bone, to be the first-ever celebrity to play "AD IQ Test". In this architecture and design quiz hosted by Derek Blasberg, Collins answers questions about Frank Lloyd Wright's inspiration for designing New York City's Guggenheim Museum, Billy Baldwin, which city has the most skyscrapers in the world, where Antoni Gaudi came up with most of his work, the designer that did Kourtney and Khloe Kardashian's homes, the age of the oldest living architect I.M. Pei, millennial pink, and bridges in Paris. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Lily Collins Takes the First-Ever AD IQ Test | Architectural Digest
Views: 451140 Architectural Digest
Inside John Legend and Chrissy Teigen’s Los Angeles Home | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
 
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In this episode of Celebrity Homes, Architectural Digest visits John Legend and Chrissy Teigen at their Los Angeles home for a house tour. With the help of designer Don Stewart, the celebrity couple created a space that is perfect for indoor-outdoor living. The terrace is outfitted with a Rodolfo Dordoni sofa, low chairs by Blackman Cruz, and a James Perse daybed with cushions and pillows covered in Sunbrella fabrics. The armchairs on the terrace are by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia. A painting by Mark Harrington and a Pottery Barn rain-drum table accent the entrance hall. In the living area, a B&B Italia sectional sofa is arranged with a vintage Osvaldo Borsani lounge chair, at left, and a silk shag carpet by Carini Lang from Woven Accents. An Alison Berger light fixture from Plug Inc. hangs above the Yamaha piano; the television is by Samsung, and the dog sculpture is from Craig Olsen. Basalt counters and floor tiles complement rift-cut teak cabinetry in the kitchen, which features a trio of stools by Emmerson Troop, a ProLine hood, and a Thermador cooktop and ovens. Legend’s home recording studio is furnished with a sofa covered in an Edelman leather. The bed in the master suite is by B&B Italia; the linens and throw are by Anichini. The artwork includes a freestanding painting by R. Nelson Parrish and a framed Sri Lankan panel from Charles Jacobsen; the figurine was retrofitted as a lamp by Stewart, and the sea-grass wall covering is by Phillip Jeffries. The master bath features Laurameroni cabinetry of rift-cut teak, an antique stone-top bench from Inner Gardens, and a Waterworks hamper. A basalt tub with Dornbracht fittings anchors the outdoor area off the master suite. A framed 19th-century Thai panel from Charles Jacobsen is displayed in the guest room; the Anta floor lamp is from Plug Inc., and the walls are painted in a Pratt & Lambert color. The guest bath is clad in basalt tile from Creative Environments; the mirror is by Paul Marra, and the towels are by Waterworks. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside John Legend and Chrissy Teigen’s Los Angeles Home | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
Views: 826272 Architectural Digest
Inside Alessandra Ambrosio's Home | Open Door
 
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In this episode of 'Open Door', Brazilian supermodel Alessandra Ambrosio gives Architectural Digest a tour of her home. The retired Victoria's Secret Angel shows AD her photography collection (including 'class' pics from the Victoria's Secret Fashion Show), classic rock music room, living room, dining room, kitchen, family room, the zipline and patio area in the backyard, bathroom, and her line of Hats for Every Occasion - Ale by Alessandra. See photos and read the full interview here: http://archdg.co/lmme5PQ Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Alessandra Ambrosio's Home | Open Door
Views: 932580 Architectural Digest
Inside Terry Crews' LA Man Cave | Open Door | Architectural Digest
 
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In this episode of 'Open Door', Terry Crews welcomes Architectural Digest into his “office”, his “fortress of solitude”, his man cave, his home away from home in LA. See photos and read the full interview here: http://archdg.co/x6YVRcA Crews confesses he's a big book guy who loves art, music, and design. The muscle-bound star of Brooklyn Nine-Nine, The Expendables, and Everybody Hates Chris throws in a quick plug for Berry Crews, his own line of yogurt. The chest-flexing actor does show-and-tell with his incredible assortment of memorabilia: boxing gloves signed by Sugar Ray Robinson, a Harlem Globetrotters basketball, a custom-made Idiocracy movie poster created by Shepard Fairey, and his Lip Sync Battle championship belt among others. Terry also shares his most influential inspirations and reveals the couch he designed, the bookshelf that turns into a bed, and the logo for his contemporary furniture collection company Amen & Amen. Finally, the former host of World's Funniest Fails presents his custom gaming pc that has a stick of Old Spice deodorant inside. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Terry Crews' LA Man Cave | Open Door | Architectural Digest
Views: 2324672 Architectural Digest
Inside Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent's California Dream House | Open Door | Architectural Digest
 
08:24
In this episode of Open Door, celebrity designers Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent (stars of TLC's Nate & Jeremiah By Design) give Architectural Digest a full-access house tour around their spectacular 1928 Spanish Colonial home in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. The house clocks in at nearly 9,000 square feet. Past the front door there’s the gorgeous grand stairway with its original wrought-iron balustrade, straight out of a movie from Hollywood’s Golden Age. Then room after room bathed in glorious sunlight, gurgling fountains, and that heavenly oak tree, literally topping everything off. And, of course, there’s Poppy, the mistress of the manor. Not even Central Casting could produce a more scrumptious sprite. The house's facelift entailed installing floors of antique marble to demarcate points of entry and transition; stripping, bleaching, and waxing the existing mahogany paneling in the dining room; replacing fireplace mantels and hardware with antique models; reworking the kitchen with new fixtures and surfaces; and furnishing the many rooms of the home in signature Berkus-Brent style. As for what constitutes clean and masculine in this context, the designers layered the house with rustic French, Swedish, and American furnishings of wood and stone, juxtaposed with more tailored Continental pieces by the likes of Jacques Adnet, Maria Pergay, Angelo Mangiarotti, and Afra and Tobia Scarpa. The through line is the doggedly neutral palette; Berkus and Brent rely on texture and patina to animate their personal interiors. The one exception to the rainbow-of-beige rule is Poppy’s bedroom and playroom. In her bedroom, Poppy has the beginnings of a proper art collection, stocked with gifts from her parents’ friends, including a dreamy mobile by Julia Condon and a Michael Hainey hummingbird painting. For Berkus and Brent, the one other space that seems to deviate from the distilled masculinity of the rest of the house is the master bathroom, which features hand-painted murals by James Mobley along with architectural details of a Prunella marble richly veined in deep purple and brown. The couple took advantage of the ample space beyond the bathroom to install two very serious his-and-his closets. In the atrium, a 19th-century bench with Kravet-velvet upholstery sits atop antique Spanish tiles from Paris Ceramics. 19th-century English glass pendant; 1950s low table from a Paris flea market; vintage club chair in a Carolina Irving Textiles stripe. In the living room, a sofa by Afra and Tobia Scarpa for Cassina, a circa-1950 Italian chair, and a pair of 1940s linen club chairs surround a marble cocktail table from Hollywood At Home. A 1950s Italian sconce hangs above a 1960s English bench covered in a Lee Jofa fabric; Belgian linen curtains by RH. In the kitchen, the island is surrounded by circa-1960 French barstools; sink fittings by Waterstone; 19th-century French lanterns. Backsplash and surrounding countertops by Ollin Stone; Whitechapel brass knobs. In the dining room, 1950s Jacques Adnet chairs join a 19th-century English table. A painting by Matt Connors hangs above a Directoire limestone mantel; circa-1970 Georges Pelletier ceramic pendant lights. In the gallery, a 19th-century Italian bookcase, an 18th-century Swedish table, and a 1950s American bench. The playroom's "memory" board and table, by RH Baby & Child; sofa and rug by RH Teen. Floor pillows and hippo basket from Anthropologie. In Poppy's room, a wallpaper by Apparatus and ZAK + FOX hosts art by Hunt Slonem, Michael Hainey, Fernando Bengoechea, and Mary Little. A Julia Condon mobile hangs over an armchair by Cisco Home wearing a Mexican Otomi textile; crib, table, and chair by RH Baby & Child; Nate Berkus stool for Target; Caitlin Wilson rug. In the master bath, a James Mobley mural and marble molding and panels from Waterworks. Tub by Signature Hardware, with Waterworks fittings; Duravit sink. Brent and Berkus's RH bed, dressed in Matteo linens, is flanked by 1970s Italian tables. The circa-1960 chairs wear an Edelman Leather suede. Circa-1950 French bronze saucer light; custom Roman shades by The Shade Store; Maria Pergay steel table; HD Buttercup rug. The pergola is painted in Benjamin Moore's Alabaster. RH pendant lights; vintage Kreiss chairs; Pottery Barn pillows. Poppy wears a Marysia Bumby swimsuit. Read the full story here --> https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/design-stars-nate-berkus-and-jeremiah-brent-show-ad-their-new-home Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent's California Dream House | Open Door | Architectural Digest
Views: 1393198 Architectural Digest
Inside Kim Cattrall's NYC Home that Has a Monkey Room | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
 
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Kim Cattrall's New York City home is even more sophisticated than her 'Sex and the City' character. When Cattrall bought her home, there was no entryway. So Kim pushed the wall back to greet guests. Next up is the living room, which Cattrall calls Temple Aphrodite and her beautiful art deco dining room table. The kitchen is where Kim loves to cook and entertain. Her love for monkeys is evidenced by her office, which she calls "the monkey room". Kim's fabulous bedroom has shades of pink and a drop-down projector screen for amusing viewings. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Kim Cattrall's NYC Home that Has a Monkey Room | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
Views: 520143 Architectural Digest
Nate Berkus Renovates His Dream Home in NYC | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
 
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in this edition of Celebrity Homes, Interior designer Nate Berkus shares how he renovated his dream home in New York City with Architectural Digest. As the longtime home-makeover maven on The Oprah Winfrey Show and later host of his own television program, he has mastered the art of creating elegant, welcoming rooms in seemingly no time at all. In the case of his Manhattan duplex, the designer—true to form—executed one of his hallmark speedy transformations, with chic results that are a thoughtful reflection of his past. Berkus bought the apartment, in a 19th-century Greenwich Village building, in 2011, after a period of renting a loft-like space in a mod Jean Nouvel–designed tower overlooking the Hudson River. His current address, discovered after several restless nights searching real-estate listings, was far from perfect when he found it, distinguished not by venerable millwork or original fixtures but by walls of whitewashed brick. Still, the floor plan possessed the key elements he wanted, namely three bedrooms (two would be for guests) and a terrace. Besides, he reasoned, even the duplex’s flaws had a certain amount of character. Berkus explores this philosophy with his new collection of furnishings for Target and in The Things That Matter, a style monograph being published this fall by Spiegel & Grau. Collaborating with architectural designer Carlos Huber, Berkus spearheaded an aesthetic overhaul that, given typical timelines, might as well have occurred overnight. In less than three months, the apartment had been renovated and decorated. Among other major alterations, the floors, whether painted parquetry or stone tile, were ripped up and replaced with white-oak boards, ensuring a seamless continuity between rooms; glass-and-metal planes were added in the form of double doors and interior partitions; and the upper level was reconfigured so that a skylit space (formerly a small gym) could become the dressing room of Berkus’s dreams. Upgrades included antique marble mantels, bronze radiator grilles, and vintage Belgian hardware as products of his double-Virgo tunnel vision. Sophisticated tweaks and clever fixes shaved weeks off the already abbreviated construction schedule. Rather than gut the kitchen, for example, Berkus retained the existing countertops and cabinets, having the latter painted a high-gloss black and crowned with moldings and ordering up matching panels to conceal the exposed washer and dryer. The apartment’s walls, meanwhile, were covered with either grass cloth or fresh coats of paint. The staircase, previously a treacherous climb owing to its lack of a railing, was finessed into a dramatic focal point with the addition of a sinuous steel banister. Whereas some people might seize upon a new residence as a reason to start shopping, Berkus instead furnished with items he had collected over time. The majority came from his Chicago home, an expansive apartment done in the 1940s by architect Samuel Marx. An enormous striped dhurrie by Madeline Weinrib, for instance, is now rolled out across the first-floor family room, where the designer hosts casual meals of takeout. (“I can’t make anything myself,” he admits.) An image of a desert landscape at Joshua Tree National Park in California, snapped by his late partner, photographer Fernando Bengoechea, creates a rugged note in the dining room, where the designer’s onetime conference table is paired with Louis XVI–style Jansen side chairs. Nate's dressing room is superbly appointed with painted floor-to-ceiling cabinets custom made to contain every element of his stylish wardrobe. Everything is where it ought to be—and now so is Nate Berkus. Establish continuity: Replacing a patchwork of parquetry and tile with oak floorboards laid in a classic herringbone pattern created seamless transitions between the first-floor rooms and achieved a harmonious look overall. Work with It: Rather than gut the kitchen, Berkus refined the space—lacquering the white cabinets black, substituting gutsy brass handles for standard pulls, and sheathing the backsplash in smart subway tiles. Improve with Age: Antique mantels, tracked down at salvage yards, added texture and a sense of history. Update: In a skylit guest room, a partial wall of dated glass blocks was supplanted by a glazed panel that does the same job—allowing sunlight to suffuse an adjoining stairwell—giving the space timeless appeal. Get the Little Things Right: Berkus used handsome hardware—from door handles to a newel finial—to elevate the character of the rooms. Don't miss our tour of Nate Berkus's New York City apartment: http://www.bit.ly/UjFBzy
Views: 277950 Architectural Digest
Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent Debate How To Style Their NYC Apartment | Architectural Digest
 
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After Architectural Digest editor in chief Margaret Russell lets Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent know their Greenwich Village home will appear in the magazine, the celebrity duo debates styling options. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent Debate How To Style Their NYC Apartment | Architectural Digest
Views: 200041 Architectural Digest
Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent Play the Newlywed Game | Architectural Digest
 
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Power couple Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent design homes together on TLC’s new home makeover show called 'Nate and Jeremiah by Design', but how well do they really know each other? Architectural Digest finds out in our own edition of The Newlywed Game show. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent Play the Newlywed Game | Architectural Digest
Views: 89796 Architectural Digest
Kris Jenner Has a LOT of Christmas Decorations For The Kardashians Home | Architectural Digest
 
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Kris Jenner spends six months planning her home's Christmas decorations. The centerpiece is a 22 foot tall Douglas-fir. It takes a team of 20 people from Jeff Leathem Design to bring Jenner's vision to life.Nearly 10,000 lights stretch out over 320 feet on this oversized tree. The foyer railing is draped with garland, which is a mix of noble fir, Doulgas-fir and cedar branches. Another 2,000 lights are hung with the garland. Krismas the Bear is a huge decoration that is over six feet tall and weighs more than 700 pounds. The artwork was flown in from Paris and spent a week in customs. It takes two fully loaded trucks to deliver all of Jenner's home decor. The massive Christmas tree ornaments weight almost a pound each. There are more than 200 ornaments on the tree. Lollipop tree toppers are three feet tall. Three white, animatronic reindeer stand by the mantel, which is adorned with all-white stockings. The mantel also has 12 feet of garland made up of 250 white and cream glass balls. The Kardashian Christmas dinner table has four centerpieces, each comprised of 100 roses. Oversized nutcrackers greet visitors upon entry. Pine garlands flank the front door. Red roses pop in Jenner's black-and-white dining area. A Christofle Mood flatware set. Strings of red roses hang from an antler-inspired chandelier. Gingerbread men in Jenner's kitchen Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Kris Jenner Has a LOT of Christmas Decorations For The Kardashians Home | Architectural Digest
Views: 253135 Architectural Digest
Kris Jenner On Her Kardashian-Jenner Family Christmas Holiday Décor | Architectural Digest
 
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We've been keeping up with the Kardashian family for 12 seasons, but there's one moment we've never seen until now: how Kris Jenner turns her home into a Christmas wonderland. AD went behind the scenes to find out what goes into the star's elaborate decorations. Los Angeles floral designer Jeff Leatham and his team of pros climbed ladders and worked in pairs to dress up three evergreens in the entryway with white lights (there are nearly 10,000 on the main tree alone) and massive red-and-white lollipops and peppermint candies. A special guest arrived later in the day: a more than six-foot-tall faceted red bear from Paris. Elsewhere, animated white reindeer nodded their heads in approval as the mantel was embellished with a 12-foot monochromatic ornament garland and luxurious furry stockings. The dining room got the cozy treatment—with a glamorous twist. Red roses were hung upside down from the chandelier above a table set with a quartet of matching flower arrangements, a pair of golden eggs, plaid linens, and snowman plates. And let's not forget Jenner's iconic kitchen. The space is officially ready for holiday parties with a lush garland draped over the cabinetry and intricate gingerbread houses on the island. Watch now to see the whole transformation by the numbers. If you expected anything but an over-the-top Christmas display from the woman behind one of the most successful business empires of the century, think again. While Kardashian matriarch Kris Jenner dresses up her Calabasas, California, home with magazine-worthy holiday decorations each year, she outdid herself this December, turning her house into a winter wonderland with help from her friend and longtime collaborator, the celebrated Los Angeles floral designer Jeff Leatham. In the grand foyer, five towering evergreens are illuminated by twinkling lights that took nearly 24 hours to install and are framed by garlands of cedar, noble fir, and Douglas fir along the stairway bannisters. But that's not all. "One of the fun things is just deciding on what the theme of the tree is going to be because that sets the tone for the entire house," says Jenner, who chose, in Leatham's words, a "Kandyland-chic" motif, complete with oversize peppermint swirls, that's beyond sweet. "The whole aspect of this beautiful black-and-white floor with the red and white of the tree—it's about shape, it's about color," he says. The pièce de résistance or, as Jenner puts it, "the thing I'm most excited about": a custom-made red metal-and-glass polar bear that was delivered from Paris and is the only one of its kind in the U.S. The contrasting palette continues in Jenner's formal dining room, where the table is set with plaid chargers, snowman-themed dishes, and luxe gold flatware by Christofle. "Plaid is very traditional, and it reminds me of being in the mountains," she says, noting her penchant for a little glam. Leatham enhanced the depth of the crimson tableware with monochromatic bouquets of red roses emboldened with hints of black calla lilies, "just to add that naughty or nice" element, he says. The bold hues give way to a more subdued take on holiday decor in the living room, where a sculptural garland over the mantel lends the feel of an elevated art installation. Animatronic reindeer stand guard over a collection of fuzzy white stockings hung by the chimney. "For us it was about whimsical—it's about fun, it's about family," says Leatham. No doubt it's a display that will inspire Christmas memories for years to come. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Kris Jenner On Her Kardashian-Jenner Family Christmas Holiday Décor | Architectural Digest
Views: 1594213 Architectural Digest
Inside Alex Rodriguez’s Sleek Miami Home Inspired by His Daughters | Architectural Digest
 
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Alex Rodriguez’s art-filled Florida house is a design triumph—and a sunny oasis for the former New York Yankees slugger and his daughters At baseball star Alex Rodriguez’s home in Coral Gables, Florida, RH chaise longues face the wet-edge pool, while James Perse furniture occupies the adjacent barbecue cabana. Architecture firm Choeff Levy Fischman designed the residence, Briggs Edward Solomon handled the decoration, and Christopher Cawley Landscape Architecture helped revamp the grounds; the property was fitted with artificial grass to conserve water. In the entrance hall are artworks by, from left, Adam McEwen, Dan Colen, and Theaster Gates; the light fixture is by Michael Anastassiades, the table is by B&B Italia, and the corner chair is by Rick Owens. The living room’s blackened-steel panels make a rugged backdrop for a Keith Haring painting (above a Spark Modern Fires fireplace) and a Gérard Van Kal Mon sculpture from Holly Hunt; an Andy Warhol portrait of Jean-Michel Basquiat. The custom-made sofas are dressed in a cotton velvet from Brunschwig & Fils, and the vintage Milo Baughman chairs sport a Holland & Sherry cashmere. The Gabriella Crespi cocktail table and Pierre Cardin floor lamp are both vintage, and the angora carpet is by Woven Accents. In the kitchen, the matte-finish oak cabinetry by Italkraft is complemented by gleaming tile; the sink fittings are by Waterworks. Paintings by Marilyn Minter and Jean-Michel Basquiat energize the dining room, which is appointed with Cassina chairs and a table from Luminaire. The chandelier was custom made by Remains Lighting, and the cylindrical urns are by Rick Owens. In the high-gloss office, a Florence Knoll pedestal table is grouped with Saarinen armchairs, all by Knoll, and a carpet by Diane von Furstenberg for the Rug Company; sconces from Flos flank Marco Ovando photographs. The bar contains a Jonathan Horowitz artwork, a multipanel television by Luxus AV, and an Eric Slayton concrete bench from Holly Hunt. A Jim Hunter sculpture is suspended near the Warren Platner lounge chairs and ottoman by Knoll; the wall unit and the Living Divani bench are from Luminaire. Briggs Edward Solomon contrasted the bar’s polished-marble top with reclaimed-wood flooring in a herringbone pattern. A Marsha Lega wall sculpture shines against a span of concrete in the master bedroom. Briggs Edward Solomon designed the walnut bed, which is joined by nightstands from Luminaire; the rug is by Woven Accents. Ella and Natasha hang out on Natasha’s Anthropologie bed; the hide carpet is by the Rug Company. A walnut-paneled guest room displays a large Adam McEwen work; the wall light is by Flos, and the Warren Platner side tables are by Knoll. Rodriguez’s bath features Waterworks sink fittings mounted on a sheet of mirror, a vintage Senufo chair from Jalan Jalan Collection, and a Malayer carpet from Woven Accents. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Alex Rodriguez’s Sleek Miami Home Inspired by His Daughters | Architectural Digest
Views: 222556 Architectural Digest
Naomi Watts and Liev Schreiber Reveal Their Renovated New York City Apartment | Architectural Digest
 
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Actors Naomi Watts and Liev Schreiber are best known for their big-screen roles, red-carpet appearances, and awards-show cameos. But in their downtime, the A-list couple retreats to a recently updated apartment in Tribeca, one of Manhattan’s most fashionable neighborhoods. After a ten-month renovation by the design firm Ashe + Leandro, with whom Watts worked closely throughout the process, the light-filled home displays elements of three archetypal New York City layouts: a stately townhouse, an uptown duplex, and a classic loft. The combination results in what the actress calls “a real grown-up apartment,” with all of the character that comes with it, from the beveled-glass kitchen cabinetry and book-lined built-ins to the dramatic archway in the entry. Rustic elements blend with softer, more graceful additions to create an eclectic look that is at once stylish and comfortable—a place where the Watts-Schreiber clan can put family first and unwind between cross-country trips. Fifteen years ago, when the British-born, Australian-raised Watts’s career was starting to blossom and she was looking for a toehold in New York City, she bought an apartment in the Financial District after seeing it once. Black-and-white floor tiles by Clé provide a graphic welcome at the Manhattan duplex apartment that actors Naomi Watts and Liev Schreiber share with their two sons; the interiors were designed by the firm Ashe + Leandro. The entrance hall’s pendant light is by Ralph Lauren Home, the 19th-century shell-back chairs are from KRB, and the painting in the stairway is by Harland Miller. She settled in Los Angeles, where she built her career in movies ranging from Mulholland Drive to 21 Grams to King Kong to last year’s Academy Award winner for best picture, Birdman. “But then I met Mr. New York,” she says, “and everything changed.” Mr. New York, of course, is Liev Schreiber, acclaimed for playing hardened, complex characters in films such as Spotlight and on the Showtime series Ray Donovan. Like so many New Yorkers, however, they soon found themselves desiring a certain precious commodity. While Watts remarks that “with New York real estate, you never get everything you want,” she and Schreiber were able to create a duplex from two separate units—one had been an artist’s loft—checking off most of the boxes on their wish list. Then, shortly after they closed the deal, Hurricane Sandy struck, and the building, near the Hudson River, was flooded. For months they couldn’t enter the property, proving another rule of New York real estate: It will test you, constantly asking, How badly do you want to live here? When the couple finally got back in, the place was a mess. After taking time to weigh options, they hired an architect but changed course several months later. Two years into owning the home, it was raw space. “One thing I’ve learned,” Watts says, “is when it comes to big renovations, no one gets an easy ride.” Ultimately they enlisted Ariel Ashe and Reinaldo Leandro, the duo behind the firm Ashe + Leandro, to design the interiors. A Ralph Lauren Home light fixture illuminates the master bath’s Victoria + Albert tub, which has Dornbracht fittings; the mirror and chair are antique, and the penny tile is by Waterworks. Images by Watts’s brother, photographer Ben Watts, are displayed above RH Baby & Child beds in the boys’ room; the pillowcases are by Ralph Lauren Home, the sconces are by Atelier de Troupe, the nightstand is by Room & Board, and the antique kilim is from Double Knot. Walking through the home, it’s hard to imagine that Watts and Schreiber had to compromise on anything. Instead it feels as if they got a rare trifecta: an apartment that elegantly combines features of three archetypal New York homes. The entranceway gives you the intimate, welcoming feeling of a historic townhouse, while the sweeping sculptural staircase evokes the drama of a stately uptown duplex, and the open yet private layout of the second floor has the urbanity of a classic loft. Throughout, robust design elements are balanced with graceful, softer gestures, whether the jewelry-like lights suspended above the brawny dining table or the floral curtains whimsically offsetting the master bedroom’s masculine blues. Indeed, the home seems to mirror the union of the broad-shouldered, intense Schreiber and the delicately luminous Watts. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Naomi Watts and Liev Schreiber Reveal Their Renovated New York City Apartment | Architectural Digest
Views: 388212 Architectural Digest
Tim McGraw and Faith Hill Play the Newlywed Game | Architectural Digest
 
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As the country music darlings head out on a world tour together, we challenge Tim McGraw and Faith Hill to a series of revealing questions after shooting their Bahamian vacation home for our summer issue cover. The country darlings, who exclusively reveal their Bahamian vacation home in an upcoming AD cover story, share their secrets to living together. Faith Hill and Tim McGraw are a Hollywood anomaly: The celebrity couple remains as smitten as teenagers after three children, four music tours, and more than twenty years of marriage. The country singers, who reveal their never-before-seen Bahamian home on a 17-acre private island in an upcoming summer issue of AD, fell for each other on the Spontaneous Combustion Tour in 1996 and are continuing their love story where it started: back on the road with the 66-stop Soul2Soul World Tour, which began on April 6. Whether it be on a tour bus, at home in Tennessee, or on their own Caribbean paradise, which they've exclusively shared in an upcoming issue of AD, McGraw and Hill seem to have mastered the art of cohabitating successfully. To figure out some of the secrets to their success, we ask them to participate in AD's twist on The Newlywed Game, where they talk to us about everything from decorating to dishes. See more here - https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/tim-mcgraw-and-faith-hill-reveal-the-secrets-to-cohabitating-successfully Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Tim McGraw and Faith Hill Play the Newlywed Game | Architectural Digest
Views: 68521 Architectural Digest
Inside Timothy Corrigan’s Château du Grand-Lucé | Architectural Digest
 
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Designer Timothy Corrigan discusses the vision behind the renovation of his French château Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Timothy Corrigan’s Château du Grand-Lucé | Architectural Digest
Views: 510872 Architectural Digest
Tour The Help Director Tate Taylor’s Mississippi Mansion | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
 
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As a boy, Tate Taylor dreamed of living in an antebellum house. The actor/writer/director grew up in Mississippi but left home in 1996 to pursue his career, first in New York and then in Hollywood. But when he returned in 2010 to film The Help—the Oscar-winning movie based on the novel by his childhood friend Kathryn Stockett—the dream “came back with a vengeance.” A columned house used in the movie was for sale but Taylor took a pass because it had little land. “I wanted to be in the middle of nowhere,” he says. After a months-long search that led him through much of the Deep South, he circled back and found the perfect place in Church Hill, a tiny community just north of Natchez: Wyolah Plantation, a 100-acre spread with a three-story Greek Revival dwelling, constructed in 1836, and eight outbuildings. It almost didn’t happen. Wyolah’s then-owner, a Brooklyn doctor, bought the estate in 1976 with the idea of reviving it and retiring there with his wife. Even though he never embarked on the restoration, he couldn’t bear to let the place go. The house was on the market for decades, with potential buyers always turned away. Undaunted, Taylor “flew up and told him my intentions,” the filmmaker explains. It worked—the man, Taylor remembers, got “teary-eyed” when he saw that his own plans could be carried out by someone else. Designer Shawn Henderson and restoration consultant Thomas E. Goodman renovated Wyolah, the 1830s Mississippi plantation home of The Help director Tate Taylor and film producer John Norris. A painstaking three-year renovation added 11 new baths. Raw attic space was converted to a full third floor with four bedrooms en-suite and a small kitchen and laundry room. The second floor got kitchen and laundry facilities as well. The summer kitchen is now a one-bedroom guesthouse, as is the charming columned office that was built by Wyolah’s first owner, a physician. The old commissary, connected to the main house by a breezeway, became the primary kitchen. The home’s original faux-marble mantels and faux-grained doors, which had all been painted over, were restored. Dining room walls were brushed with a romantic mural of local flora and fauna by Don Jacobs, a Mississippi artist who created similar scenes for the governor’s mansion in Jackson, the state capital. To help with Wyolah’s decor, Taylor called on his friend Shawn Henderson, a Manhattan-based designer whose ardently contemporary taste admittedly contrasts with Taylor’s admiration for all things antique. For example, Henderson says he swallowed hard when Taylor brought a 19th-century heirloom settee to his attention, but soon the family treasure was upholstered in sleek brick-red leather and placed beneath a guest room window, opposite a German botanical chart depicting huge mushrooms. For his part, Henderson reports that his greatest challenge was trying to reflect his client’s personality. The center of Wyolah’s action is the elegantly proportioned music room, where friends come to play the resident piano and guitars (Taylor calls himself an enthusiastic “fake singer”) before continuing their revelries around a bonfire. Mick Jagger, a producer of Taylor’s James Brown biopic, Get On Up, has stayed over, as has Academy Award-winning actress Octavia Spencer, who starred in both The Help and Get On Up. Though Taylor has a place in Los Angeles and keeps an apartment in Manhattan’s East Village, he considers Wyolah his primary residence—and he has turned it into something of a filmmaking mecca. Recently he bought the plantation house next door and made it into a postproduction facility, while Wyolah hosts everything from visiting executives to workshops for aspiring filmmakers. Before he began work on his latest project an adaptation of Paula Hawkins’s thriller The Girl on the Train—Taylor had DreamWorks Studios executives and the film’s director of photography as guests at the home for several days, he says, and “we planned the whole movie.” Read more here --> https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/tate-taylor-help-director-renovates-mississippi-mansion Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Tour The Help Director Tate Taylor’s Mississippi Mansion | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
Views: 146520 Architectural Digest
Inside Zedd's $16 Million Mansion That Has a Skittles Machine | Open Door | Architectural Digest
 
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In this episode of Open Door, Grammy-winning record producer and DJ Zedd gives an in-depth tour of his $16 million mansion in Benedict Canyon, an area of Los Angeles that's near Sherman Oaks and northwest of Beverly Hills. Zedd's self-decorated home is 9,500 square feet with views of the canyon and tons of full-length glass windows. See photos and read the full interview here: http://archdg.co/x3PLMMq The house is structured into three sections: work, living, and sleep. The work section has Zedd's recording studio and an unfinished gym. The driveway leads into the front entrance, which crosses a moat. A huge wall with cubbies holds art, awards, and silly memorabilia. For instance, Zedd's Grammy sits next to a poop emoji. At the end of a corridor, before going outside, guests can pick their favorite flavor of the rainbow from the Skittles machine. Zedd also has a server room and a "Costco Room" that contains just about anything he would need if he weren't able to leave the house for a long time. The bathrooms feature automated blinds that can sometimes surprise the person taking the shower early in the morning. The remote-controlled curtains in Zedd's bedroom make him the happiest of any feature in the house. Outside, the pool has a hidden jacuzzi / hot tub that's revealed when the pool's water level drops. The kitchen has four built-in hibachi grills, a pot filler above the stovetop (which Zedd says is the reason he bought the house), and built-in vacuums. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Zedd's $16 Million Mansion That Has a Skittles Machine | Open Door | Architectural Digest
Views: 23064382 Architectural Digest
Hannah Bronfman and Brendan Fallis's NYC Triplex Is a Minimalist's Dream | Architectural Digest
 
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Hannah Bronfman and Brendan Fallis blended their distinct styles for a home that feels like a retreat. DJs Hannah Bronfman and Brendan Fallis blended their distinct styles in their Manhattan triplex for a home that feels like a retreat. Social media devotees of Hannah Bronfman and Brendan Fallis aren’t strangers to the interior of the twosome’s home. (Collectively, the couple has nearly 430K followers on Instagram alone.) Bronfman posts frequent spalike dispatches from her envy-inducing bathtub, while Fallis has offered a glimpse inside the couple’s pristine kitchen and fully stocked bar. Their apartment, a one-bedroom East Village triplex, has become the backdrop for the Insta-worthy life they've created together, since meeting at Art Basel Miami six years ago. 2015 was a big year for the couple: They got engaged and purchased their first home together. After a gut renovation and redesign of the space by architect Jeffrey White of EAU, the apartment is now receiving the finishing touches—which is perfect timing. The modern, serene space will provide a fresh start for the newlyweds, who will be married later this month in Marrakech. Because she and Bronfman both travel internationally for work as DJs, they relied on digital tools to streamline the design process. Fallis works with several start-ups and Bronfman is the founder of HBFIT, a health and wellness website, so it doesn't come as a surprise that the tapped-in couple used a service like Homepolish to help coordinate the details. Otherwise, something as simple as picking out a fabric swatch could get tricky. Bronfman and Fallis collaborated with Homepolish and Design Within Reach on a redesign of the new space—and took virtually nothing from their former NoLIta apartment. The triplex's unique layout includes a loft-style second floor with a cozy den, and what Bronfman calls a "cloud-like" bedroom, which opens to an expansive outdoor space with an outdoor shower—a covetable luxury in New York City. Designer Michelle Zacks employed a minimalist aesthetic, using lots of neutral tones, complimentary textures, and brass accents to tie everything together. Fallis, the true pragmatist of the pair, says: "Bright colors tend to move with the times. We prefer it this way." Though Bronfman says Fallis has taught her to be "more practical and less sentimental when it comes to home purchases," she counts crystal bottles from Fallis's grandfather, custom wallpaper in the powder room by Candice Kaye, a claw-foot tub, and a Lacanche range among her best-loved pieces in their new home together. In addition to highlighting the couple's most-prized possessions, the new design enhances the multilevel layout, catering to the couple's penchant for entertaining. "Our new dining table seats eight people, so we try to constantly mix up the groups and introduce new friends," Bronfman says. "That's the best part about creating this home." See more here - https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/hannah-bronfman-brendan-fallis-new-york-city-triplex Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Hannah Bronfman and Brendan Fallis's NYC Triplex Is a Minimalist's Dream | Architectural Digest
Views: 174617 Architectural Digest
Jeremiah Brent Transforms an NYC Apartment from Basic to Breathtaking | Architectural Digest
 
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Celebrity designer Jeremiah Brent (The Rachel Zoe Project and The View) used color and texture to lend warmth and intimacy to a cookie-cutter home in NYC's the West Village. Despite the frequent television appearances and occasional magazine feature on his sweet family, Jeremiah Brent remains first and foremost a designer. His passion for interiors is palpable. Brent is the host of OWN’s Home Made Simple and will star in TLC’s Nate & Jeremiah By Design with husband Nate Berkus. Naturally, the decorator put his own personal design beliefs to use in the overhaul of a spare 2,500-square-foot New York apartment for a Nicaraguan family that values both function and style. First on the agenda: creating a space that felt unique to the clients while maximizing the space to accommodate their lifestyle. Brent incorporated paneling along the ceiling, which imparts subtle texture and a soothing sense of warmth in a dining nook off the kitchen, a space that’s versatile enough to serve as dinner-party site and reading perch. He also built bookcases along one wall and a hallway that you can close off for privacy, and installed glass-and-iron doors to create a moody, inviting foyer that he says “grounds you when you walk in the door.” And a room Brent refers to as the “James Bond office” doubles as a guest room and is enclosed by glass doors that, with the touch of a button, go cloudy to establish privacy for visitors. Another element that made the apartment’s transformation possible was Brent’s innovative use of saturated hues. He continued the shade onto the drapery and the sofa’s upholstery to create a cohesive cocooning effect. A pair of vintage Joseph-André Motte chairs reupholstered in a burnt-orange Lee Jofa velvet add a layer of sumptuousness that deepens the cozy feel. The sense of continuity carries into a muted gray guest room, a space that underscores both the atmosphere of refuge that pervades the residence and the personality of the family that lives there. A table by Andrianna Shamaris anchors the dining nook off the kitchen, where vintage 1950s school chairs sit across from a banquette topped with cushions upholstered in a Pierre Frey fabric. A mirrored backsplash adds contemporary flair to the built-in bookshelves Brent installed along the wall opposite the dining nook. In the living room, the custom sofa is upholstered in an indigo Schumacher fabric that coordinates with the walls and drapery, which is a gauzy Nate Berkus for Fabricut textile. A pair of vintage Joseph-André Motte chairs are reupholstered in a burnt-orange velvet from Lee Jofa. The custom console conceals a flat-screen television that rises up from a flap in the piece’s uppermost surface. The guest room is dominated by a Room & Board bed dressed in cozy linens; the chair is from Galerie Bachman, and the nightstands are by Interlude Home. To reference the wall of windows in the living room, Brent installed iron-and-glass doors off the kitchen to create an intimate entry. “It’s a really nice space that grounds you when you walk in the door,” he says. Moody black walls add to the enveloping effect. Read the full story here --> https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/jeremiah-brent-transforms-a-manhattan-apartment-from-basic-to-breathtaking Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Jeremiah Brent Transforms an NYC Apartment from Basic to Breathtaking | Architectural Digest
Views: 209920 Architectural Digest
Inside Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka’s Home That Has a Magic Office | Architectural Digest
 
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Architectural Digest visits actors Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka at their townhouse in Harlem. A Jonathan Adler light fixture crowns the living room, where Room & Board sofas are grouped with a high-back chair designed by Powell & Bonnell for Dennis Miller Assoc., Arteriors nesting tables, and a bespoke Trace Lehnhoff cocktail table. The parlor floor’s central hall features a vintage Venini light fixture and (atop pedestals) sculptures by Tom LaDuke; works by Ed Templeton are arranged along the staircase. In the music room, walls clad in a Donghia fabric serve as a backdrop for a large Annie Lapin painting, which overlooks a Yamaha player piano and a Bourgeois Bohème Atelier chaise longue. Holly Hunt pendant lights are suspended above the Caesarstone-top island in the kitchen, which is equipped with a Wolf range and hood. Furnished for entertaining, the parlor-floor salon is outfitted with a bar that was salvaged from a Connecticut hotel and acquired from the Demolition Depot/Irreplaceable Artifacts; the chandelier is by Carolina Fontoura Alzaga, and the artworks are by Ed Ruscha, Ahmed Alsoudani, and Francesca Gabbiani. The walls of the den are covered in an Andrew Martin wallpaper and decorated with colorful magic memorabilia; the guitars are by Gibson and Jean Larrivée Guitars, the vintage desk and chair are from Arte de Mexico, and the sofa is by RH. A wall covering by Calico Wallpaper adds intrigue to the master bedroom, where a Jason Miller light fixture from Design Within Reach hangs above the custom-made bed, which is upholstered in a Rose Tarlow Melrose House fabric. Anchored by an RH Baby & Child bunk bed, Gideon’s room is enlivened by a Flash Gordon lithograph and a Keith Haring chair by Vilac; the Roman shade is of a DwellStudio fabric for Robert Allen, and the carpet is by Safavieh. The master bath’s shower fittings and tub are by Kallista, and the tiles on the tub surround, walls, and floor—as well as the python-patterned mirrored tile—are by Ann Sacks. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka’s Home That Has a Magic Office | Architectural Digest
Views: 1509662 Architectural Digest
Inside John Legend and Chrissy Teigen’s NYC Home | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
 
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In this episode of Celebrity Homes, John Legend and Chrissy Teigen show their New York City apartment, which features: -- A Donald Sultan painting in the living area, a framed Polly Borland tapestry hangs on the wall; the dark leather armchairs are vintage Arne Norell designs from Emmerson Troop, the bronze side tables are by Stephanie Odegard Collection, and the carpet is by Doris Leslie Blau. -- In the dining area, a mixed-media work by Mike Weber, a bronze bureau by BDDW, and an Aldo Bakker sculpture. Beneath a light fixture by Ochre, Ted Muehling candlesticks from BDDW cluster on a table from Lucca Antiques. -- Pendant lights by Early Electrics in the kitchen, cabinetry designed by Don Stewart, a custom-made backsplash by Mosaic Sphere Studio; cooktop is by Bertazzoni, stools are by Anna Karlin from Atelier Courbet. -- Master bath features travertine walls and a black limestone herringbone floor, outfitted with a Jacques Garcia mirror by Baker, tub and fittings by Waterworks, taboret by Paul Mathieu for Stephanie Odegard Collection. -- A 19th-century gilded-leather screen from Dmitriy and Co. spans one of the bedroom walls; 1970s chandelier is from Lucca Antiques, bed is from Siglo Moderno, table lamps are by Kriest, green silk coverlet is by Frette, carpet is from Doris Leslie Blau. Transcript We wanted a place that was, you know, much more just homey and had more soul to it. When we were looking around town, we stumbled upon this place. And it's in a neighborhood that we really love, and we just felt like this was a great place for us to move in to. This apartment just kind of embodies everything that I love. Obviously I love dark and rustic but still very clean and very chic. It just feels like our place in LA as well but in New York. So we worked with Don Stewart again on this house. He designed our house in LA as well. And we love working with Don. We duplicated this wooden wall behind us and put it in the bedroom as well because originally it was just a clean white bedroom. We built a whole new bathroom, and got rid of another massive bathroom that was on the other side of the apartment. Oh yeah, I made the big bath, it's now John's closet so he has to walk from the shower back to his, but it's a big closet though so you are very lucky there. This is my favorite. No, I love it, I love seeing it when I walk in. It adds a little whimsical vibe. Yeah. And our dogs are in love, especially Putty. Putty makes love to it on often occasion. Oh my goodness, wow. I think the best things about this apartment is this beautiful unique kitchen. In the original version of this apartment, didn't really fit this aesthetic as well. Yeah, it was too modern. It was too clean, it was white. It just didn't feel like it fit everything else that was happening. So we made it fit and Don designed this amazing set of cabinets. And that's one of the best things about this apartment, just this beautiful unique kitchen. For me the kitchen is really important. It's the first thing I think about when we find a beautiful apartment like this. It's a place I'm going to be most of the time. I want it to be perfect for me. So Don did a wonderful job designing it. Obviously we love an open space. I'm a big TV fan. I want to be able to cook, drink wine, watch TV at the same time. So we made sure it was nice and open. This island is just gorgeous and I love the bar stools and of course the backsplash is gorgeous too. She makes pretty much everything well. She's really good at everything savory. I think I'm kind of notorious for cooking really low and slow meals. I love things that take four or five hours. We had to have two ovens. That all had to do with the holidays. For Thanksgiving we had over people and I made side dishes. Yeah, so we needed multiple ovens. We needed a lot of... It's actually illegal I think for us to have this much power usage with these two ovens. We live on the edge. We live on the edge, we're crazy. But I think we're violating some kind of code. Shhh. I'm the sous-chef, I do chopping. And taking out the trash. Every once in a while though he does want to cook for me, but it's hard for me to just sit on the couch. She won't watch me, she won't let me just cook. It's frustrating to watch. I can make a mean fried chicken though. Yes, he's in charge of the fried chicken and the macaroni and cheese. Those are his specialties. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside John Legend and Chrissy Teigen’s NYC Home | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
Views: 2615033 Architectural Digest
Inside Ricky Martin's Serene Los Angeles Home | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
 
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Superstar singer Ricky Martin -- who plays Antonio D'Amico on The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story -- and his partner Jwan Yosef take Architectural Digest inside their LA home. Yosef's artwork adorns most walls. The couple shows AD their kitchen, family room, Martin's Grammy collection, the sound-proof screening room, the massive hallway, interior patio, master bedroom, gigantic bedroom, zen-inspiring firepit, recording studio and art studio. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Ricky Martin's Serene Los Angeles Home | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
Views: 3595076 Architectural Digest
John Robshaw’s Modern Spin on Ancient Art of Block Printing
 
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Join textile designer John Robshaw in his home and design studio. In this video, part of Lincoln’s Continental Stories series, Robshaw demonstrates the art of block printing, and talks about the way his frequent travels to India affect his business and his life. Produced for Architectural Digest with Lincoln. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. John Robshaw’s Modern Spin on Ancient Art of Block Printing
Views: 978362 Architectural Digest
Real Housewives Star Carole Radziwill Tours Her NYC Apartment | Open Door | Architectural Digest
 
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On this episode of Open Door, Carole Radziwill from The Real Housewives of New York City has given her downtown sanctuary a full face-lift, including that famous sofa from her mother-in-law, Lee. Carole Radziwill is a best-selling author and Real Housewives of New York star. At her two-bedroom SoHo apartment, there is only one picture of her late husband, Anthony Radziwill, and only one overt reference to the Bravo show—a bronze apple that nods to the RHONY opening credits. Her extensive childhood collection of Swarovski animals has been pared down to just a few keepsakes, reminders of her humble all-American upbringing in Suffern, New York. Over the years, special attention has been paid to one item of furniture: the vintage sofa that once belonged to her mother-in-law, tastemaker and sister of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Lee Radziwill. Custom-made in the late 1960s, with tiger-stripe upholstery of Brunschwig & Fils silk velvet, the sofa has appeared in the pages of Vogue and Elle Decor, traveling from her mother-in-law's Park Avenue penthouse to Anthony’s bachelor pad, which he and Carole shared before moving into their own Park Avenue apartment. When Carole relocated downtown to SoHo after Anthony’s death, the sofa came too—ultimately serving as a recurring character of sorts on RHONY, the status of its exterior woven into the show’s plotlines at times. Time, of course, is no friend to fabric. A decade ago, when the original upholstery began to show serious signs of wear, Carole performed emergency sofa surgery, salvaging the backs of the cushions and the couch’s untouched bottom. With the help of interior decorator John Bossard, whom she met at a party in Aspen, Colorado, Carole sifted through the hundreds of fabric samples she had gathered. She finally settled on a Lee Jofa velvet in muted French blue. Carole collaborated with Bossard to replace the living room’s existing gold-and-brown palette with an updated scheme of silvers and blues. Her other sofa—this one curved—received its own fabric face-lift, as did a pair of Dunbar club chairs. Walls were refinished or repainted, and new pieces were mixed with old ones Radziwill felt were worth keeping during the overhaul, including twin Brutalist table lamps, a shagreen-top console, and a button-tufted banquette that Carole modeled after the booths inside New York nightclub Bungalow 8. Upstairs, meanwhile, the small second bedroom, which Carole had previously used as a multipurpose space (part office, part closet, part glam room), was transformed into the dressing den of her dreams, with meticulously organized shelving, a bespoke wall covering, and perfectly separated hangers. That created a need to move her vanity to her master bedroom, which in turn demanded its own update. Gray Ultrasuede walls now serve as a sumptuous backdrop to an antique-mirrored dressing table and a chest of drawers with floral mosaic fronts. Ceramic petals by artisan Bradley Sabin flower above the headboard. Bossard likens the space to a French bordello, a comparison that Carole readily embraces. Read the full story here --> https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/carole-radziwill-gives-ad-a-tour-of-her-soho-duplex Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Real Housewives Star Carole Radziwill Tours Her NYC Apartment | Open Door | Architectural Digest
Views: 186368 Architectural Digest
Expert Guesses Cheap vs. Expensive Bed Sheets | Price Points: Home | Architectural Digest
 
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In this episode of 'Price Points: Home', Bedding expert and Founder of Buffy.co Leo Wang guesses which one of two bed sheets is more expensive. For each round of bed sheets, Leo looks at material (fabrics like cotton, silk, satin, etc), thread count, and weave, before guessing which set of bed sheets costs more. Once the prices are revealed, Wang explains why a specific set of bed sheets costs more and how to make the different bed sheets. Furnished by Feather, France & Son. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Expert Guesses Cheap vs. Expensive Bed Sheets | Price Points | Architectural Digest
Views: 239899 Architectural Digest
Inside Alexandre de Betak's Fun NYC Loft That Has a Secret Pole Dancing Room | Architectural Digest
 
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The Fellini of Fashion, Alexandre de Betak and his wife, the Most Stylish Woman in NYC Sofía Sanchez Barrenechea de Betak, guide us through their pied-a-terre, which the couple describes as playful, fun, versatile, and European-ish. The apartment features Japanese architecture, an in-wall cold sake machine, a secret passage through a bookshelf leading into a karaoke / pole dancing room. Take one step inside the Manhattan loft of Alexandre de Betak and his wife, Sofía Sanchez de Betak, and you know you’re not in Kansas anymore. The epic social/entertaining space at the heart of the home—“living room” doesn’t begin to describe it—feels like a set for a Pina Bausch performance or some outré production of an Ionesco or Pirandello play. Among the dramatis personae are postmodern chairs by Peter Shire and Marinus A. Vljim, freestanding chain lamps by artist Franz West, pyramidal light sculptures by André Cazenave, and a Louis Durot seat in the form of a woman’s upturned torso and legs. There’s also a Vespa parked by one of the columns and a swing hanging from the ceiling. The mise-en-scène is redolent of drama and possibility. Given the homeowners’ résumés, the eccentric milieu should come as no surprise. Alexandre built his reputation transgressing the boundaries between the worlds of fashion, art, and design. His namesake firm, Bureau Betak, has produced some of the most indelible fashion shows, events, and exhibitions of the past three decades—with the impresario himself taking on the roles of art director and designer. His Argentine-born wife, the former Sofía Sanchez Barrenechea, plotted her own trajectory through the beau monde as a high-profile art director, travel guru, and fashion maven. The couple’s 2014 wedding in Patagonia featured ushers sporting Darth Vader helmets and a giant blow-up of the Star Wars villain—a bit of cheeky pop culture to leaven the glamour of the bride’s Valentino couture gown and the resplendent natural beauty of the setting. Playfulness and humor are clearly essential parts of the de Betak program. Witness the tatami room in their Manhattan loft, which includes three types of sake on tap, a video projector, and a hydraulic table that rises mysteriously from the floor for casual dining. Or the proliferation of vintage Japanese toys throughout the home. For more adult divertissements, there’s a handy stripper pole in a hidden, mirror-paneled lounge where guests retire for postprandial high jinks. “You can’t build an apartment from scratch and not make a secret room,” Sofía explains matter-of-factly. The fun continues in the bedrooms of Alexandre’s two teenage sons, Amael and Aidyn. One room is tucked discreetly in a loft space above the mirrored bar; when the kids are in residence, the stripper pole becomes more of a fireman’s pole, perfect for fast escapes. The other bedroom is constructed of metal scaffolding, Erector Set–style, with platform beds and an integrated desk below. For gastronomic pleasures, Alexandre created the ultimate chef’s kitchen, centered on a monumental stainless-steel island that is the ne plus ultra of bespoke cookery. Predictably, the couple enjoys entertaining, and the kitchen allows them to do so on a grand scale, whether that means cooking pasta for 100 for a book launch or making paella for a throng of fashion-forward guests. But for all of its sybaritic bells and whistles, the apartment hews more closely to the rough-and-ready SoHo artists’ dwellings of the 1960s and ’70s than it does to today’s so-called luxury lofts. The deliberately unfussy materials palette includes weathered floorboards reclaimed from an upstate New York barn; cabinetry of brushed oak with linen-backed copper grilles; and stainless steel for a dash of early-1980s high-tech realness. Pipes and radiators are largely left exposed, as are the original wood columns and beams. The layout of the space has a similarly old-school loft vibe, particularly in the open-plan core, where one could easily picture the mandarins of Abstract Expressionism performing their alchemy on heroically scaled canvases. Full story here --> https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/this-minimalist-manhattan-apartment-is-full-of-hidden-fun Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Alexandre de Betak's Fun NYC Loft That Has a Secret Pole Dancing Room | Architectural Digest
Views: 72748 Architectural Digest
Inside Toms Shoes Founder Blake Mycoskie's Los Angeles Home | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
 
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Toms founder Blake Mycoskie and his wife, Heather Mycoskie, describe the design process behind their bohemian-chic Topanga Canyon residence. Blake Mycoskie, the social-entrepreneurship guru and founder of the footwear company Toms, has a wonderfully idiosyncratic Los Angeles–area home he shares with his wife, Heather, and their infant son, Summit. Blake and Heather met five years ago in Montauk, New York, on Long Island’s East End. At the time, Blake was working on the manuscript of his book Start Something That Matters. He stopped at a surf shop to get wax for his board and saw Heather working behind the counter. It wasn’t long before she relocated to L.A. for a job at Toms, where Blake’s pioneering business plan entails matching every product sold (now not only shoes but also coffee, bags, eyewear, and apparel) with a donation to benefit one of many needy international communities. Fast-forward to 2012, when the couple married in a tepee on a Utah mountain. Settling in California, the newlyweds initially lived on a 45-foot cabin cruiser anchored in Marina del Rey, a community in Los Angeles County not far from the Toms headquarters in the seaside neighborhood of Venice. They considered building a house on one of Venice’s charming walk streets—as locals call the pedestrian-only thoroughfares—but the allure of open space ultimately drew the Mycoskies to look inland. Eventually they decided to move to Topanga Canyon, that storied redoubt of hippies, artists, and other free spirits. They purchased a 1970s residence, built in a style one might call contemporary barn, set on a one-and-a-half- acre hillside site with majestic oaks and a gurgling creek. Renovations began, but the couple soon realized that rebuilding and outfitting a home are mighty tasks for people constantly on the go. Around the same time, Heather dropped by Hammer and Spear, an L.A. home-furnishings emporium and multidisciplinary design studio, and discovered its aesthetic was simpatico with her own. After chatting with the shop’s proprietors, designer Kristan Cunningham and her husband, Scott Jarrell, Heather hired the firm on the spot. Their design choices, she says, were guided by her clients’ already well-developed ideas and predilections. “Blake and Heather wanted everything to feel personal, layered, and evolved—nothing too designer-y. The biggest challenge was taking all of the amazing objects they’d acquired around the world and combining them in a way that felt truly authentic. The house couldn’t look like a bohemian Colonial Williamsburg.” Working with decorative-finishes specialist Bruce DeSpain, Cunningham reskinned the interior walls and beams with weathered barn siding and corral fencing, adding a patina of age. “Life is about memories more than things,” Blake says, and thus every room is redolent of stories and experiences and filled with reminders of the couple’s history. The vestibule is paved with reclaimed planks from the Coney Island boardwalk, where Heather’s grandparents met. Treasures from the Mycoskies’ travels include the master bath’s rustic Indian doors, the Balinese desk in Blake’s office, and a massive Buddha statue in the garden. All those pieces mingle amicably with vintage finds and custom-made pieces from Hammer and Spear and other vendors and fabricators clustered in downtown L.A.’s bustling Arts District. PSS Design Cult, a design/build firm, collaborated on several elements, including the kitchen’s hood and brass countertops and the outdoor shower. Artist and designer Mark James Yamamoto painted the Native American–themed ceiling in the den, while furniture designer Stephen Kenn fashioned the room’s steel-framed sofa and covered it in tent canvas from World War II. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Toms Shoes Founder Blake Mycoskie's Los Angeles Home | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
Views: 141071 Architectural Digest
'The Crown' Sets Explained by the Show's Set Designer | Notes on a Set
 
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In the first-ever episode of 'Notes on a Set', 'The Crown' production designer, Martin Childs, breaks down the locations and sets used for filming scenes. Childs explains how his team used Lancaster House and Wilton House to represent rooms in Buckingham Palace as well as other designs to step in for the HMY Britannia and Tony's studio. Childs won an Oscar for his work on 'Shakespeare in Love', and received an Oscar nomination for 'Quills'. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. 'The Crown' Sets Explained by the Show's Set Designer | Notes on a Set
Views: 92558 Architectural Digest
Inside Ellen Pompeo’s Hamptons House in Sag Harbor | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
 
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Grey’s Anatomy star Ellen Pompeo shows us around her modern barn in the Hamptons. Ellen Pompeo's Sag Harbor Home Is a Modern Take on a Classic Barn. The Grey's Anatomy actress embraces the history of the Hamptons. Pompeo purchased the property eight years ago, while pregnant with her daughter Stella. The plan was to turn the cabin into the guest house and build a larger main house next door, but the main residence took a backseat to a different project: a beach house on the West Coast. With construction finished on the guest house—which would now have to function as the main house—Pompeo set out to tackle the decorating process. Working with a fraction of the footprint she'd imagined for the main house would be a challenge. Ellen reconnected with Estee Stanley, a principal of California-based Hancock Design along with Brigette Romanek, whose clients include Rachel Zoe, Chris Evans, Jessica Biel, and Pompeo's Grey's Anatomy co-star Patrick Dempsey, that she decided to finalize the design process on the Sag Harbor home. Stanley and her design partner, Brigette Romanek, used a mix of custom pieces (which they shipped to the Hamptons) and local finds including multiple antiques to outfit Pompeo's home. Wyeth Home, in Sagaponack, and Ruby Beets, in Sag Harbor, are two of their favorites. "I love the partners at Ruby Beets. We got in there and chitchat and shop. They remind us of us," says Romanek. The layered rugs were found at Lawrence of La Brea, and the mirror on the left wall was custom made by Hancock Design. The navy couch was custom made by Hancock Design, the sconces are from Circa Lighting. Hancock Design does a litany of custom pieces for clients, and in the foyer, a wood banquet from Bloom in Sag Harbor curves around a coffee table from Wyeth. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Ellen Pompeo’s Hamptons House in Sag Harbor | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
Views: 371409 Architectural Digest
Inside Project Runway Judge Nina Garcia’s Manhattan Apartment | Celebrity Homes | Arch Digest
 
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Nina Garcia, the fashion editor and Project Runway judge, invites AD into her family’s stylish Manhattan home. Nina Garcia has had to do quite a bit more than click her vertiginous Tom Ford heels to make herself feel at home. For years she was too busy juggling the roles of mother, fashion director of Marie Claire, and judge on the popular reality show Project Runway, now airing its tenth season, to focus on creating a stellar personal haven. But with help from the right designer, it finally came together. After weeks of attending fashion shows in Paris or Milan, along with the affiliated cavalcade of dinners and parties, the New York City–based Garcia prefers to retreat into a private world where the volume is dialed all the way down. Seven years ago she and her husband, David Conrod, a managing partner and co-founder of G2 Investment Group, purchased a three-bedroom apartment in a 1908 building on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The space, once part of a larger flat, was a tangle of small rooms, but with work dominating their lives at the time, it was more than adequate. Then, in 2006, as real-estate fairy tales so often go, shortly before Garcia became pregnant with the couple’s first child, Lucas, the adjoining unit came on the market. (Another son, Alexander, followed in 2010.) That apartment was their residence’s missing half, and the pair pounced on it and started making plans. Initially, the renovation and decoration of the now-four- bedroom abode proved to be “slow, expensive, hit or miss, sometimes a nightmare,” Garcia says. On one of her Paris trips she spotted a set of Carl Malmsten klismos-style chairs that haunted her on the flight back to the States. A friend suggested she might find something similar at the SoHo decorative-arts gallery BAC, which is owned by Cuban-born designer Carlos Aparicio and known for fine midcentury works. The chat was fruitful, and a bond was formed. Aparicio soon took over the Garcia-Conrod project, which included restoring architectural details, as well as enlarging the living room so the couple could entertain more comfortably. Meanwhile, architect and client explored their shared affinity for French and Scandinavian furnishings of the 1930s and ’40s. While visiting Milan, Garcia wandered into Galleria Nilufar and fell in love with the chic emporium’s early-20th-century Swedish carpets—a passion of Aparicio’s, too. Often with long piles and vivid hues, the floor coverings recall the weavings of lesser-known Berber tribes, and it’s easy to imagine their unusual charms appealing to style-setters who have embraced neutral, diamond-motif Beni Ouarain carpets in recent years. Aparicio, for his part, thrills to the clash of the shaggy Scandinavian textiles against all that polished minimalism. The living room, with its blue, beige, and chestnut palette and low, laid-back furnishings, communicates its personality most vigorously through textures: the iron of a Jean Royère lamp, the raw silk of the sweeping curtains. That muted scheme continues in the master bedroom, though the materials become more sumptuous; the curtains, for instance, are gray cashmere. There, Garcia cobbled together a combined workspace and vanity by teaming a Frank desk with a standing triptych mirror made for fashion designer Geoffrey Beene. Garcia’s dressing area, however, is a no-mans-land, a spacious sanctum where she carefully assembles each season’s wardrobe, drawing from storage units she maintains elsewhere. Lately, she has been gravitating to jackets and cigarette pants. It had better work because Garcia acts as her own stylist on Project Runway. The stardom that has come with the show, she confesses—with “all the tweeting and blogging and talking to the camera”—has pushed her completely out of her comfort zone as a magazine editor. But Garcia has learned to embrace change. Read more here: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/nina-garcia-project-runway-new-york-apartment-article Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Project Runway Judge Nina Garcia’s Manhattan Apartment | Celebrity Homes | Arch Digest
Views: 319726 Architectural Digest
Inside Tommy Hilfiger's Closet | Closet Confidential | Architectural Digest
 
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In this episode of Closet Confidential, Architectural Digest takes a look inside the closets of Tommy Hilfiger and Dee Ocleppo Hilfiger to see some of their favorite pieces, which era influences their styles the most, and how their house reflects their style. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Tommy Hilfiger's Closet | Closet Confidential | Architectural Digest
Views: 173641 Architectural Digest
Aerin Lauder's Debut Home Collection
 
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Go behind the scenes of our photo shoot and hear the talented tastemaker talk about her far-flung inspirations and lifelong love of design Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Aerin Lauder's Debut Home Collection
Views: 23883 Architectural Digest
Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent Reveal What's In Their Closet | Architectural Digest
 
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Home decorators Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent -- stars of Nate and Jeremiah by Design -- give Architectural Digest a peek inside the closet of their Manhattan house. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent Reveal What's In Their Closet | Architectural Digest
Views: 423949 Architectural Digest
Inside Michael Kors' Penthouse Apartment in Greenwich Village | Open Door
 
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In this episode of 'Open Door', iconic fashion designer Michael Kors takes Architectural Digest on a tour of the Greenwich Village apartment he owns with husband, Lance LePere. The NYC apartment has been fully customized down to the hidden sliding doors that allow it to morph from open and loftlike to fully compartmentalized. Plus, it’s wrapped by a lush terrace beyond which lie unobstructed views south to the World Trade Center, west to the Hudson River, and yonder in every direction. See photos and read the full interview here: http://archdg.co/7HxjkUB Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Michael Kors' Penthouse Apartment in Greenwich Village | Open Door
Views: 1712743 Architectural Digest
Alexa Hampton’s Renovation Tips
 
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From sconce height to paint finish, AD100 designer Alexa Hampton shares her secrets for a perfect renovation Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Alexa Hampton’s Renovation Tips
Views: 26671 Architectural Digest
Inside Julianne Moore’s New York City Townhouse | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
 
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Julianne Moore brings new life to her beloved family home. The Oscar-winning actress lights up the big screen in 2017 with a hat-trick of high-profile films: Todd Haynes’s Wonderstruck, George Clooney’s Suburbicon, and Matthew Vaughn’s Kingsman: The Golden Circle. Moore fell in love with her West Village NYC townhouse 15 years ago. At the time, the five-story house had been carved up into apartments, but the original front-and-back-parlor configuration was intact, as were the floors, shutters, fireplaces, and staircase. The renovation was orchestrated by her husband Bart Freundlich's architect brother, Oliver Freundlich, and his then-partners Ben Bischoff and Brian Papa. The makeover lasted a year and a half, after which the actress stocked the house with a George Nakashima cocktail table, lamps by Isamu Noguchi, a Florence Knoll credenza with rattan doors, and a host of un-pedigreed but sympathetic vintage finds. As months and years passed, the actress expanded her collections, refined the rooms they inhabit and implemented an extensive redesign of her garden by Brian Sawyer of the AD100 firm Sawyer | Berson (AD, March 2012). She moved the living room downstairs, where it could serve as a casual, semi-cloistered family hangout, and brought the kitchen upstairs. “I cannot recommend more strongly putting your kitchen somewhere with lots of natural light. It changed everything. The transformative spatial inversion—again executed by brother-in-law Oliver Freundlich—may have taken liberties with period orthodoxy, but the effect is anything but jarring. The kitchen feels like an inviting social space, centered on a slender Parsons-style table (custom-made to fit the room’s proportions) that sits atop a Moroccan carpet. Cooking and storage functions are held to the perimeter. “I don’t really like traditional kitchen cabinets or islands, so I wanted everything to feel like furniture. I copied the hood from a Vincent Van Duysen design I had seen. I met him not long afterward, and I copped to stealing his design,” Moore says. As part of the latest spatial reorganization, Moore moved her office from the front parlor on the main floor, where foot traffic and street noise were frequent distractions, to a quieter room on an upper floor. She works at a Pierre Jeanneret desk, sitting in a Jeanneret chair, beneath a Paavo Tynell hanging light. The bookshelves beside the desk neatly encapsulate the Julianne Moore story: Family photographs mingle amicably with her Academy Award and a bevy of other professional laurels, alongside stacks of old decorating magazines and monographs on the work of her favorite designers. A la cornue range stars in the kitchen, beneath a minimalist hood by Best. In the kitchen, a Jack Pierson photograph hangs above a custom-made cabinet by ivory build with Vola sink fittings. Custom table; vintage French chairs and Moroccan rug. A Noguchi lantern hangs from the original molded ceiling in the living room of Julianne Moore’s New York townhouse. a Sally England cotton rope arch hangs against a wall painted in Farrow & Ball’s pitch black, and a George Nakashima table sits atop a Moroccan rug from the Nazmiyal collection. Martin Eisler chairs; Kawai piano; Paavo Tynell lamp; vintage Florence Knoll cabinet. A Nan Goldin photograph hangs in the master bath. Kohler tub with Carrara marble surround; Grohe fittings. Cabinet by Willy Van Der Meeren. A Louise Bourgeois artwork hangs over the upstairs living room's black marble mantel. In the downstairs living room, Edelman leather covers the Harvey Probber sofa and vintage ottoman. Vintage Danish chair and Eames rocker in sheepskin; Carl Auböck side table. Custom-made bed sits on an Odegard rug. Triangle Charlotte Perriand stool; Paavo Tynell floor lamp; Axel Einar Hjorth chair; David Armstrong Photograph; Wyeth sconces. An antique English trough in the sawyer | Berson–designed garden. Woodard outdoor furniture; sculpture by Alma Allen. In the sawyer | Berson–designed garden, an Alma Allen sculpture stands amid the boxwood. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Julianne Moore’s New York City Townhouse | Celebrity Homes | Architectural Digest
Views: 694461 Architectural Digest
How to Update Your Living Room in 3 Easy Steps | Interior Design Tips | Architectural Digest
 
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Interior designer Rita Konig shows Architectural Digest how to refresh an outdated living room with just a few tricks and even less time. Transcript My name is Rita Konig, I'm an interior designer from London. And here are three of my go-to formulas for reinvigorating your house when it's feeling a bit sad. One is to rearrange your art. When you do change your pictures out, not only do you change the look of the room, but you also see things that you'd stopped seeing. It's hard to give hard-and-fast rules about what to do and what not to do to get your gallery wall together. But there are a couple of things that I always realize that I'm doing. And one of them is this sort of tram lines, and not ending up with a sort of map of Manhattan with avenues and streets. The minute I see a highway going up the wall, just shove a picture out so that it breaks that straight line. And the same the other way. Another quick thing to do is to buy an old quilt or use a throw over the back of the sofa, or even over the whole thing and then put new pillows in front of it. Just adds new texture and is a way to bring in some new pattern. Let's say you have lovely, big, white sofas. And then in the winter, feel like you want to just enrichen it a little bit. You know, a dark mohair, delicious throw like this across the back with some dark purple velvet. Just these new textures are so lovely and bring a sort of completely new vibe. Just literally move all the furniture around. You completely and utterly change the whole feel. And what's really funny is when you do that, it really forces you to sort of see things differently. So if you're bored of your house, don't turn it upside down, get the decorators in, and feel like you've got to throw everything out and start again. You can change it up so easily by just moving the dial a little bit to the left or the right. And moving things around. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. How to Update Your Living Room in 3 Easy Steps | Interior Design Tips | Architectural Digest
Views: 51803 Architectural Digest
How to Design a Flower Arrangement from a Pre-Made Bouquet with Oscar Mora | Architectural Digest
 
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Florist Oscar Mora shows Architectural Digest how to design a flower arrangement from a pre-made bouquet often seen at a grocery store. Blooms from the grocery store have a bad reputation, but with a little love, a couple of bouquets can be transformed into up to seven gorgeous, high-style flower arrangements. Transcript Hi, I'm Oscar Mora. Welcome to my floral design studio in New York City. Today I want to show you how to design a beautiful, elegant arrangement like this one from a pre-made bouquet, like one of those that you get in the grocery stores. So let's separate it by the colors and the shape. Once we've got them separated, let's make a diagonal cut. That is always helpful for allowing the flowers to drain more efficiently. We're gonna get this lazy susan, and our favorite place to start. Our first step is to create a net for designing the arrangement and keeping the stems in the right place. Let's trim these leaves and trim the stems a little shorter to start to adapt the flowers to our vase. Start to group them in a way that they create a cluster in this corner. So here we have our first little arrangement that looks definitely not from a deli. With the rest of the material we created over seven arrangements. You should be ready to run to the grocery store and start trying your floral design skills. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. How to Design a Flower Arrangement from a Pre-Made Bouquet with Oscar Mora | Architectural Digest
Views: 25543 Architectural Digest
Inside Carolina Herrera's Beverly Hills Boutique | Architectural Digest
 
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The acclaimed designer Carolina Herrera gives Architectural Digest a personal tour of her new Beverly Hills boutique. “I always wait for the perfect place to open a store, so I was very excited when this Rodeo Drive location became available,” says acclaimed designer Carolina Herrera, photographed in her new CH Carolina Herrera boutique on the storied Los Angeles shopping boulevard. The California flagship for her lifestyle brand—consisting of chic women’s, men’s, and children’s clothing, as well as accessories and travel items—is housed in a 2,700-square-foot space that emphasizes old-world sophistication, giving subtle nods to the city’s Spanish heritage with elements like plaster-tile ceilings, marble floors, and oak dressing-room partitions studded with cast iron. Also on display is Herrera’s new Crisp White Cotton shirt line, a tribute to her own iconic wardrobe staple. “There can be no wrong way of wearing one,” Herrera says. “A white shirt always looks snappy and seductive.” Much like the designer herself. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Inside Carolina Herrera's Beverly Hills Boutique | Architectural Digest
Views: 106358 Architectural Digest
Jaime Lannister on Which "Game of Thrones" Character Would Survive Prison | Architectural Digest
 
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"Game of Thrones" star Nikolaj Coster-Waldau's new movie "Shot Caller" is about life inside a modern prison. How does it compare to the fantasy dungeons of "Game of Thrones"? And which characters would be real-life shot callers? Architectural Digest finds out in this insightful interview. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Jaime Lannister on Which "Game of Thrones" Character Would Survive Prison | Architectural Digest
Views: 103322 Architectural Digest
Exclusive Sneak Peek of Ralph Lauren Home’s West Village Collection | Architectural Digest
 
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Architectural Digest’s Hal Rubenstein takes you on an exclusive tour of Ralph Lauren Home’s New York City showroom. Rubenstein starts with the tufted Chesterfield sofas in the living room. Next up are the ebonized walnut book casings, which add careful design, but also warmth. The West Village bed embodies relaxed sophistication. Though monochromatic, the wall's layout and adornments have diversity. The collection has an unexpected sense of harmony and always radiates intimacy. Still haven’t subscribed to Architectural Digest on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2zl7s34 ABOUT ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST The leading international design authority, Architectural Digest features articles and videos of the best in architecture, style, culture, travel, and shopping. Exclusive Sneak Peek of Ralph Lauren Home’s West Village Collection | Architectural Digest
Views: 216566 Architectural Digest